• Bravo, makes perfect sense to me. Hunting for my food is a passion. Nothing beats sitting down at the dinner table knowing what you are about to consume, you worked for, you sweat for, and most likely bled a little for. Makes it taste that much better going down.

    • SoleAdventure

      Amen, Philip! It is hard to beat that satisfaction of a meal that you worked for.

  • Great post! I’m kind of sad I didn’t get a dinner invite though…

    • SoleAdventure

      Come on up, Ben! Dinner is on me.

  • Great post Mark. Makes perfect sense to me. Congrats on putting some meat in the freezer.

    • SoleAdventure

      I knew that you would get it!

    • SoleAdventure

      It sure was tasty! I can’t wait for lunch today; leftovers are on the menu.

  • Man that meal looks good… Congrats on the harvest and great post. There’s nothing like knowing you earned what’s on your plate and in the freezer.

  • Tom Sorenson

    Great food pictures – makes me hungry and I just ate breakfast about 30 minutes ago. I admit to have fleeting thoughts of “is this worth it?” when I’m packing close to 100 pounds of elk on my back and know I’ve got to go back for two more similar loads. But then when you sit down and sink teeth into those delicious morsels…nothing like it. Besides, if you ask me on the right day when the memory isn’t so fresh and muscles so sore, I just might tell you I kinda enjoy those meat packin’ trips, too.

    • SoleAdventure

      Good thoughts, Tom. “Is it worth it?” – If you take a traditional approach of investment vs. reward, then the answer is clearly, “No”. The price of last night’s dinner, in terms of money, time, and effort,
      was ridiculously high. But it is a price that I will gladly pay.

      • Tom Sorenson

        That nails it. Once when I was freshly married and having dinner with my new in-laws (non-hunters) I was telling them about how hunting gave us inexpensive meat. My mother-in-law called me on that – and I got defensive and upset. (we actually have a much better relationship these days! :) ) But looking back, I see she was right – cheap meat is not a reason to hunt…but that’s not really why most of us hunt, anyway. Meat is sure a sweet bonus, though. Such a sweet bonus, even, that calling it a bonus doesn’t do it justice, either. I hunt for meat, but not exclusively – does that make sense? Interesting discussion – I feel like I’m talking in circles, now. :) I love hunting. I love wild meat. I love wild meat enough that I prefer it over beef – and I love hunting enough that the effort and expense isn’t something I look at as a cost…it’s just part of the experience that I love. I think I smell a blog idea.

        • SoleAdventure

          Facing the fact that your mother-in-law is right…that’s a tough one. LOL!

          “I love hunting enough that the effort and expense isn’t I look at as a cost…” BINGO! You nailed it there.

          I smell something, too, besides venison… Get to work on that blog post, I can’t wait to read it.

  • Agreed. Great post!

    • SoleAdventure

      Thank you!

  • First off, congrats on the doe! Again, making me hungry again, but that’s not hard to do. You certainly earned that deer!

    This is an interesting post because I have a slightly different take on it. If you consider where I think you are directing this post (average adult hunter, FT job, family, etc) I can see the point. For me, learning to hunt as a child was indeed for food. If I told you guys how little money my family had growing up your jaw would drop. We supplied much of our red meat through hunting. We also had it a bit different as we lived on a farm, had plenty of bean and corn fields around and lots of deer. Filling 6 to 10 tags in a season was not uncommon and much was done with a bow, but there was shotgun season, too.

    In this day and age and where I am at now, it is definitely more passion… but, by doing this we are also well prepared should we ever have to truly hunt to live. Excellent post Mark!

    • SoleAdventure

      Good thoughts, Al. I’m sure that, though the times may have been hard, there are some great memories of that way of living.

  • I have a slightly different take on it, I think. I enjoy that part because it proves I can do it myself. Much like someone may want to build their own shed or cabin, or change their own oil. It’s not always about was it worth it based on monetary reasons. It was worth it because that is how it is supposed to be done. Not always the easy out, but the hard “I can do it’ way. In regards to Tom or Al, the packing out of the elk yourself on a do it yourself hunt is much more satisfying than the caged ‘hunt’ that can be purchased as well.
    Nice story Mark, and congrats.

    • SoleAdventure

      Great points, Bill. I’m actually on the same page…although it isn’t “worth it” on a practical level, it is worth it to me for the satisfaction of knowing that I’ve worked for it.

  • Great article Mark. Nothing is more rewarding then sitting down for a dinner with something “you” were able to put on the table. Don’t get me wrong, a nice steak from the store tastes good, but it’s not as good as the game meat you worked for to harvest. I guess what I’m saying is hard work tastes good.

    • SoleAdventure

      Yes it does!

  • Allan K.

    Great Post and I would agree most hunters don’t hunt just for the
    meat. It’s everything that goes into hunting, before the hunt, during the hunt, and afterwards. I’ve lost count how many times I’ve enjoyed a hunt only to come home empty handed. However, when I get lucky and sit down to a great meal, the sense of
    reliving the entire hunting experience not only supplies a sense of accomplishment,
    but also contributes to the respect I have for the animal. I do know I would not acquire that level of respect by purchasing the meat at the local store.

    • SoleAdventure

      That’s right, Allan…The whole process of the hunt, not just the kill, is what makes putting dinner on the table so meaningful.

  • I keep the meat from only about 25% of the deer I kill. I generally donate the rest to the hungry in my area. It’s a win-win-win. I get to do what I love, those less fortunate than me get fresh meat, and I assist with keeping the deer population in check. Makes perfect sense!

    • SoleAdventure

      That is definitely a win-win-win! Thanks for sharing with those in need.

  • Great post Mark! For me going into God’s grocery store for hours or even days has more value not just for the soul, but for the respect for what it took not that long ago, to provide food for family.

    • SoleAdventure

      Amen, John!

  • Delicious!